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Winter Care Series: Part 4 - Fish

Posted by Bob Rogers on 9/25/2020 to News
Winter Care Series: Part 4 -  Fish

In the fourth and final part of our Winter Care series, we’ll be talking about what most, I’m sure, consider the most critical aspect of their ponds, and that’s the gorgeous fish that populate your outdoor water features.
 
It’s only natural to be concerned for your fish in the winter, but on the contrary, most fish are completely safe during the winter as long as you take sensible precautions. Natural selection will occur with the weak, sickly, and young, recently-hatched fish; this is normal and merely a part of nature.
 
The most important thing you need to do first and foremost to keep your fish safe and healthy is making sure a section of your pond stays unfrozen at all times, which is essential because otherwise, harmful gasses can stay trapped under the ice and kill your fish as well as some plant life. There are several ways to keep this from happening. Since we went over this in Part 1 - Pumps and Equipment, we will link it down below at the end of this article. 

Once that is taken care of, it is time to discuss feeding habits. Most decorative, cold-water fish are incredibly hardy and can withstand colder temperatures. Similar to trees, their metabolisms will slow down, allowing them to survive without the need for regular feeding. For those of you with Koi or goldfish, we recommend using the specifically-formulated API Cool Water Food to take care of your Koi and Goldfish during the winter months. Rich in essential nutrients that help growth and color, this pellet food boosts immune systems and will make sure your fish stay healthy and happy during the colder temperatures. 
 
We hope this four-part series has helped you get ready for the winter, and as always, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us! For the other parts of our four-part Winter Care series, please click the links below! 
 
Part 1: Pumps and Equipment 
 
Part 2: Pond Liners and Stone 
 
Part 3: Plants

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